Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings Tucson

Airline Air: Recirculating Jet Air Linked to Illness

Dec 28, 2016 11:43AM

Matej Kastelic/Shutterstock.com

Aerotoxic syndrome is the medical term for the illness caused by exposure to contaminated air in jet aircraft, and it’s causing that ailment, plus the permanent disability and even death of airline employees and passengers. Whistleblowers have been met with ridicule and termination. The problem has been called the “asbestos of the airline industry” by critics. French scientist Jean-Cristophe Balouet, Ph.D., who discovered the syndrome in 1999, thinks it may have already affected 250,000 pilots, cabin crew and passengers worldwide.

In 1963, aircraft moved from drawing fresh air into the cabin to “bleeding” part of it from the engines. The synthetic oil used by jets contains organophosphates used in pesticides and nerve gas, and was banned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for residential use in 2001 because of known toxicity. The byproducts of these carcinogenic organophosphates can also include aldehydes and carbon monoxide.

Airplane seals wear out and there are no chemical sensors onboard aircraft to detect fumes—only noses to detect the “dirty sock” odor. The Aerotoxic Association continues to push for air quality detectors on all planes and the Cabin Air Quality Act sponsored by California Senator Dianne Feinstein.


For more information, visit Aerotoxic.org.


This article appears in the January 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Upcoming Events Near You
Join Our Email Newsletter

COMING IN PRINT: 2020 April Issue
Due Date: March 10. Be a part of our upcoming April issue.
Contact [email protected] for cheerful and efficient help with your marketing!
Missed the print deadline? Try email news!

Email News Exclusives with Social Media pushes; ask us about it today! [email protected]

Current Issue
Visit Us on Facebook
2020 Editorial Calendar

 

Instant Home: 3D-Printed Buildings on the Rise
Balance Water Consumption for Cognitive Health