Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings Tucson

Too Blue: Algae Loss Colors Ocean

Jun 28, 2019 09:38AM

The world’s oceans may be getting bluer, thanks to climate change. The effect is more likely to be detected by satellites than Earthbound people, and is caused by the depletion of marine phytoplankton as seawater warms. A new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology published in the journal Nature Communications predicts that more than 50 percent of the oceans’ collective 140 million square miles of surface area will likely be affected by 2100. Marine ecologist and leader of the study Stephanie Dutkiewicz says, “These microscopic organisms live in the water and are the base of the marine food chain. If there are less of them in it, the water will be slightly bluer.” Phytoplankton serves as a food source for small sea creatures that are eaten by fish, squid and shellfish. If phytoplankton populations dip too low, vital fisheries in certain areas could be decimated.


This article appears in the July 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Join Our Email Newsletter

COMING IN PRINT: 2020 May Issue
Due Date: April 10. Be a part of our upcoming May issue.
Contact [email protected] for cheerful and efficient help with your marketing!
Missed the print deadline? Try email news!

Email News Exclusives with Social Media pushes; ask us about it today! [email protected]

Current Issue
Visit Us on Facebook
2020 Editorial Calendar

 

How to Protect Yourself and Others from Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Ways to Calm Your Anxiety with Meditation During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Biodegradable Cooler Keeps Food Cold and Dry