Skip to main content

Natural Awakenings Tucson

Latin American Tree Bark Improves Diabetes Markers: Extract Helps People with Type 2

kenary820/Shutterstock.com

A study from the University of Prague, in the Czech Republic, has found that extracts from the bark of the Hintonia latiflora, a tree grown in Mexico and South America, can help regulate blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes.

Researchers administered a capsule containing a dry concentrated extract from the plant to 32 subjects with the condition and monitored their blood glucose levels for six months. The subjects experienced an 11 percent decrease in glycated hemoglobin, an indicator that the body can better regulate blood glucose levels during the period, as well as a slight reduction in cholesterol and triglycerides. The researchers also found the natural treatment resulted in a 25 percent reduction in fasting blood glucose levels and a 22 percent reduction in post-meal glucose levels. Liver enzymes showed improved levels in the subjects, as well. No adverse side effects were observed.


This article appears in the May 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Presented by Transformational Medicine
Show us your best shot of summer in Tucson! Enter our Photo Challenge from July 1-15. The top 5 photos will be voted on by our readers and online friends from August 1-15. The winning photo will be featured in our September issue, and the photographer will win a $40 La Botana Mexican Restaurant gift certificate, plus a $100 certificate to a local business of your choice!
Sponsored By
Join Our Email Newsletter

COMING IN PRINT: 2020 AUGUST Issue
Due Date: July 10. Be a part of our upcoming August issue. Contact [email protected] for cheerful and efficient help with your marketing!
Missed the print deadline? Try email news!

Email News Exclusives with Social Media pushes; ask us about it today! [email protected]

Visit Us on Facebook
2020 Editorial Calendar

Interview with Stephen Dinan of The Shift Network
Eat More Citrus for a Thinner Waistline
COVID Kids: Stress Can Impact Sperm and Future Offspring